Fun and relaxing things to do at home

We’re pulling together ideas and inspiration for activities that you can do to relax at home. If you have any ideas or suggestions of free resources, please email them to press.office@downs-syndrome.org.uk. Thank you.

Click each heading, below, to see our suggestions:

Dancing

There are lots of dancers and dance groups with online lessons and tutorials. Here are a some we’ve come across…


Dance Syndrome will be sharing free online classes on their YouTube and Facebook page.

They’ve got a week’s worth of lessons already planned but you can always catch up with them at a later date.


Tailfeather Dance (whose most famous pupil is Andrew Self) have got tutorials, warm ups and dance fitness routines on their YouTube and Facebook pages.


If you have any other recommendations please email them through to DSAPress.office@downs-syndrome.org.uk

Creative

Do you have LEGO at home? Each day LEGO’s official Twitter account sets a #BuildTogether challenge. See what today’s challenge is here.


Colouring, doodling and drawing can be very relaxing.

Colouring books are wonderful…there’s all sorts available…or you could try making your own patterns?

Doodlewash produce monthly art challenges that might inspire you. Click here for the latest one and an archive of previous months’.

ArtBox London have a special tutorial on Fun with Pattern on their website.

Crayola have free downloadable colouring sheets on their website for all ages.


My Perspective

Why not take a look through the photographs you have on your phone, tablet or computer and pick three to enter in this year’s My Perspective competition?

We’ve extended the deadline for entries until 29 May 2020. You’ll find all the details of the competition here.

 


If you’re looking for more ideas and inspiration try the world’s art gallery’s. Although we can’t visit them in person, several have virtual tours you can enjoy. Here’s a collection of some of the best from around the world.

This page includes virtual tours from more museums and experiences you might want to take a look at.


If you have any other recommendations please email them through to DSAPress.office@downs-syndrome.org.uk

Entertainment

Headphones Photosymbols.comFree audio books from Librivox. You can browse by genre, title and author.


Audible are offering free children’s audio books for the duration of the school closure. If you’ve never used Audible before, there is some guidance (in a pdf document) here.


David Walliams is sharing thirty stories from his latest book The World’s Worst Children 2 to listen to. Check out his Audio Elevenses here or follow him on Twitter for a reminder.


Actor Samuel West is recording a poem a day and sharing them on Soundcloud…he asked for suggestions on Twitter so the selection is varied.


There’s a selection of live animal webcams listed here if you want to check out what our furry, feathered and scaly friends are up to.

Steve Backshall is answering all your wildlife, conservation, geography and exploration questions live every day at 9.30am on Facebook and YouTube.


From the 2 April the National Theatre will be streaming some of their amazing productions every Thursday evening via their YouTube channel. Productions coming up in April include One Man, Two Guvnors, Jane Eyre, Treasure Island and Twelth Night.


Puffin Books have some very famous names on their YouTube channel doing readings (some complete books, some excerpts) for under 5s and 6 to 12 year olds. They also have ideas for book related crafty activities.


 

If you have any other recommendations please email them through to DSAPress.office@downs-syndrome.org.uk

Growing things

Growing flowers, herbs and plants in your garden (if you have one) or on a kitchen window sill can be enjoyable and good for your health and well-being.

GardenersWorld.com has a beginner’s guide to growing vegetables as well as a video guide to planting up herbs in a window box.

It is still ok at the moment to be out in your own garden.

You can order seeds online or from catalogues or you could try planting seeds from vegetables you buy in the supermarket. This can be a bit tricky but there is some useful advice in this thread on the Gardeners’ World forum.

It could be something as simple as a Cress Head like this one from CBeebies.